7 literary journals from Africa to read over the holiday period.

With the holiday upon us, here is information on the latest issues of 7 literary journals that offer some of the best writing coming out of the continent you can dig in. They are listed in alphabetical order.

Arablit Quarterly

Recent Issue: December 2020

ArabLit Quarterly is a literary magazine that brings together Arabic literature, essays, wordplay, art, music, and food in translation, founded in 2018 by Arablit.org’s M Lynx Qualey.

The latest issue themed around “dreams”, published on December 15, features work by Sahar Elmougy, Ameer Hamad, Sheri Younis, Tareq Imam, Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi, Barrack Rima, N.A. Mansour, Nawal Nasrallah, Ema Abu Saleh, and more.

Click here to check it out.

BKO magazine

Recent Issue: December 2020

BKO is a tri-monthly thought-leadership literature publication, devoted to imaginative work such as short stories, poetry, experimental, flash fiction, and essays. BKO Literature Magazine is published and owned by Geko Publishing.

The most recent issue published on December 18 is a special edition dubbed “Horns for Hondo at 30.” This is dedicated to the thirtieth anniversary edition of Horns for Hondo written by Lesego Rampolokeng in 1990. The issue has essays on the work by the famous South African poet, several essays on a variety of topics and loads more. It also has poems from Lesego Rampolokeng, Mamosebetsi Mosia, Xitha Makgetha, Serame “Icebound” Makhele, Kobus Moolman and others.

Click here to check it out.

Doek!

Recent Issue: November 2020

Doek! is a free, independent, and pan-African online literary magazine produced in Windhoek, Namibia. Founded by Mutaleni Nadimi and Rémy Ngamije, It publishes short fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art from Namibia and the African diaspora..

The latest issue published on November 2, features work by Filemon Liyambo, Natasha Omokhodion-Banda, Jarred Thompson, Bisi Adjapon, Maaza Mengiste, Merdi Mukore, Ndegwa Nguru, Undjizuva Kaputjaza, Tinotenda Mashumba, Beata Umubyeyi Mairesse, and many others.

Click here to check it out.

Johannesburg Review of Books

The Johannesburg Review of Books

Recent Issue: December 2020

The Johannesburg Review of Books is a publication giving a view of world literature through African eyes.

The newest offering published on December 10, dubbed the “fiction issue” edited largely by Jennifer Malec features work from Jarred Thompson, Wamuwi Mbao, excerpts of work by Yaa Gyasi, TJ Benson, Angela Makholwa, Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, Adekeye Adebajo, and loads more.

Click here to check it out.

Kikwetu Journal

Recent Issue: December 2020

Born out of a Nairobi-based writing group in 2015, Kikwetu is an annual online literary journal that publishes both new and established writers from East Africa and beyond in English and Kiswahili.

The newest issue published on December 8 features work from Gladwell Pamba, Peace Mbengei, Kasimma, Duncan Mwangi, Ebele Mogo, Jadesola Ajao and P. Ochieng Ochieng.

Click here to check it out.

Lolwe

Recent Issue: December 2020

Lolwe is an online magazine that publishes fiction, literary criticism, personal essays, photography, and poetry founded by Troy Onyango in 2020.

The latest edition published on December 22 is guest edited by Mapule Mohulatsi, Gbenga Adesina and Esther Karin Mngodo. It has fiction, essays, poetry, and photography from among others Derek Lubangakene, Osamudiamen Joseph, Kabelo S. Motsoeneng, Howard M-B Maximus, Gloriah Amondi, Nkateko Masinga, Isaac Ouro-Gnao, and Jerrice J. Baptiste

Click here to check it out.

Omenana

Recent Issue: December 2020

Omenana, founded by Mazi Nwonwu and Chinelo Onwualu, is a tri-monthly magazine that is open to submission from speculative fiction writers from across Africa and the African Diaspora.

The latest edition, published on December 22, features work from Rešoketšwe Manenzhe, Tobi Ogundiran Precious C.K., Alvin L. Kathembe, Somto O. Ihezue, and Natalie Sifuma.

Click here to check it out.

2 Replies to “7 literary journals from Africa to read over the holiday period.”

  1. Thanks for sharing these works… coming from the diaspora I hope READING the LOCAL languages will assist in my pick up of vocabulary

  2. Yenyewe Chief this was exactly what I needed to get to reading. Been looking for african literature source for a while. Consider some advertising or Search engine optimisation for your site.

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