Novelist NoViolet Bulawayo receives the 2014 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for fiction on Friday at the Carnegie Library in Northwest Washington.  (DeNeen L. Brown/The Washington Post)

Novelist NoViolet Bulawayo receives the 2014 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for fiction on Friday at the Carnegie Library in Northwest Washington. (DeNeen L. Brown/The Washington Post)

Another Day, another writing prize for Noviolet Bulawayo. After killing them with the Etisalat Prize, short lists for the Man Booker Prize and many more it was time for the good folks at the Neale Hurston/ Richard Wright Legacy Award for fiction to give her theirs. This is why the Zimbabwean writer was at the Carnegie Library in Northwest Washington to received her award for her debut novel “We Need New Names” on Friday.
Of course you know what the tale is about; Darling growing up in a shanty called Paradise in Harare and then moving to the paradise of America (USA).
The judges of the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award described Bulawayo’s novel as a story of two continents.“It felt like an imperative read,” said Marita Golden, a novelist and co-founder and president emeritus of the Hurston/Wright Foundation.
So what is this latest prize she is winning? The which Neale Hurston/ Richard Wright Legacy Award was founded in 1990 to ensure the survival of black writers and literature by black writers.
There were other winners on the day wih the non-fiction nod going to Craig Steven Wilder for his book Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities. Wilder is a history professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology who writes in his book that before the American Revolution, merchants and planters became benefactors and “new masters” of a colonial society.